Wellesley College Sustainability Co-op
Members of Wellesley’s Sustainability Co-op, as active advocates of sustainable change, work to provide, grow, and cook food for ourselves in a sustainable conscious manner, educate the community on issues of the environment and sustainability, contribute to and strengthen sustainable action and understanding within our own college community and the broader local and global communities, and to be mindful and commit in our daily lives to measures that conserve all our resources. To that end, we present The Scoop Blog, where we will post ideas and inspirations, successfully sustainable meals, and issues that cause us to rethink and redefine sustainability. Ultimately, we hope to present the nuances and complications of living more sustainably, and that doing so brings not only delicious food, but also community.
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Oh wow, I fell behind on this one!  Earlier this month SCoopie Kily Wong hosted a dumpling making workshop and party, and it was a wild success!  They made veggie dumplings, steamed red bean buns, and scallion pancakes.  EVERYTHING WAS DELICIOUS AND MAGICAL.

(Also check out the fab color coordination that all these fashionable and beautiful scoopie friends are working)

Earth Day co-founder killed and composted girlfriend →

Remember, this Earth Day…

Is this real?


Come hear Professor Julie Matthaei speak about her research on the Solidarity Economy, followed by discussion and Q&A on the recent debates on the topic of raising the minimum wage. Lunch will be served!

This is lunchtime on the day of the Coop Panel! Go to this talk and get some lunch, and then come ask all us coops questions about capitalism too!
Facebook event for the Solidarity Economy Talk @ 12:30
Facebook event for the Coop Panel @ 7pm

Come hear Professor Julie Matthaei speak about her research on the Solidarity Economy, followed by discussion and Q&A on the recent debates on the topic of raising the minimum wage. Lunch will be served!

This is lunchtime on the day of the Coop Panel! Go to this talk and get some lunch, and then come ask all us coops questions about capitalism too!

Facebook event for the Solidarity Economy Talk @ 12:30

Facebook event for the Coop Panel @ 7pm

Storytelling | WZLY News →

Check out more Wellesley Stories on the new WZLY News blog! 

A romantic SCoop Spring Brunch.  

Photo by new scoopie Jamie Yang ‘17

A romantic SCoop Spring Brunch.  

Photo by new scoopie Jamie Yang ‘17


Check out our spam series for our Co-op Panel next week!

EVERYONE IN THE BOSTON AREA, YOU ARE WELCOME TO COME!

"What’s the difference between a worker’s coop and a housing coop?"
"Sounds like modern day communism."
"Do I have to be a vegetarian?"
"If I join a coop, how can I subvert capitalist and patriarchal power?"

These are all things you can ask us at the Co-op Panel. Join us for an intimate evening where we bring together members of housing cooperatives from Wellesley and Boston to tell stories and discuss why we live cooperatively. 


Anderson Forum 7pm
Wednesday April 23rd

Bring a mug for fancy tea. 


Ask us more questions here, on our Facebook event, or on Twitter @WellesleySCoop


~~~~~~Featuring~~~~~~
Moderator: Professor Julie Matthaei, Economics Department 
Member of Cornerstone Cohousing

Panelists
Kayla Northrop ‘14 - Instead Feminist Coop
Kennedy Stomps ‘15 - The Scoop: Wellesley’s Sustainability Co-op
Rebecca Leung ‘13 - Big Top Coop and SCoop alum
Gabe Baldwin - Sunrise Cooperative in Jamaica Plain

WAAM-SLAM II Transformative Justice and Education Bill →

waamslam2:

This lack of resources and support from Wellesley directly contradicts the pledged values and mission that Wellesley publicly states on its website and official publications. This inconsistent and false representation on the part of the college will no longer be tolerated. The diversity that Wellesley claims to value is not systemically present in the curriculum, student demographics, and support systems. The very students who are expected to possess pragmatic leadership to enact positive social change in the real world have not acquired the necessary education in understanding social constructs and systems of oppression such as race, class, gender, and sexuality. 

Through the motto “Women Who Will,” Wellesley presents itself as an institution that encourages students to act as agents to empower their communities and enact positive transformation in the real world. But, as of now “Women Who Will” only pertains to the outside world, not within the Wellesley bubble. If Wellesley claims to produce educated graduates who become world leaders, the change must begin here. 

According to its website, “Wellesley’s full-engagement academic philosophy extends to the running of the College itself. The student voice is central to decision-making here.” As central decision-makers, we have outlined the various demands that highlight the institutional flaws, including those demands from the WAAM-SLAM movement in 2001 which have been overdue for more than 10 years.

READ THIS. 

This is something Wellesley desperately needs and has been putting off for 40 years. 

Source : waamslam2
In other news, hopefully it will stop raining so we can start hanging out the scoop hand towels to dry. 

(thanks Hannah for the find and the great capitalism prez today)

In other news, hopefully it will stop raining so we can start hanging out the scoop hand towels to dry. 

(thanks Hannah for the find and the great capitalism prez today)

How Do Living Cooperatives Subvert Capitalism?

A common phrase around SCoop is “subvert capitalism!” But what does it  mean to step outside the capitalist paradigm? And how are SCoopies doing this in daily life? Hannah and I (Mack) gave a presentation at this week’s SCoop meeting about how many living coops like SCoop are structured in a way that subverts capitalism.

1. Coops practice democratic decision-making. All coop members have equal power in decision-making.

2. Coops value all types of work and non-monetary exchange. While capitalism prioritizes economic efficiency, coops value work differently and look for creative solutions to create value, such as repurposing milk from a failed yogurt attempt. Coops also exchange skills and practice non-monetary forms of exchange like bartering and dumpster diving.

3. Coops challenge the idea of individualism. Capitalism says that every person should have private property (own car, own house, own control over finances). Coops challenge this by sharing property and space within a group.

4. Coops (can) focus on sustainability. Capitalism emphasizes non-stop economic growth at the expense of people and the environment, but part of SCoop’s mission is to learn how to live in a way that isn’t exploitative. Sustainability also involves taking care of one’s physical and mental health and creating healthy, supportive communities.

5. Coops are, well, cooperative, not competitive. Capitalism embodies the idea that someone’s advancement has to come at the expense of someone else. Coops create communities that benefit all involved, and thereby challenge the idea of a social/economic pyramid in which for one person to be at the top, someone else needs to be at the bottom. 

6. Coops challenge the idea that laziness is negative. Capitalism says that individuals have to work hard to have a good life. Cooperative living is a way of sharing responsibilities between people to minimize work for any one person, and maximize enjoyment. Cooperative living re-defines “laziness” as something positive. It’s okay to just spend time with one another - there is value in relaxing and forming relationships.

- Mack


Some very important SCoop history was shared on WZLY’s Story Hour with Jessica Yung ‘17 last week.

SCoopie Ellen Bechtel ‘14 nervously recounts what happens when we combine new friends, Tibetan Monks, and a vegetably-clad nude photoshoot. 

Source : SoundCloud / ebechtel